Track 1: Sustainable Data Spaces: Digital Ecosystems, Smart Services, and Business Models

Track chairs:

Hendrik van der ValkTU Dortmund University, Germanyhendrik.van-der-valk@tu-dortmund.de
Thorsten SchoormannUniversity of Hildesheim, Germanythorsten.schoormann@uni-hildesheim.de
Stephanie WinkelmannTU Dortmund University, Germanystephanie.winkelmann@tu-dortmund.de

Description:

In light of our society’s grand challenges, almost every organization seeks to achieve a sustainable, digitalized (production) system. Guided by changing customer requirements and political frameworks, such as the UN’s Agenda 2030 including the Sustainable Development Goals, businesses have to constantly adapt their processes, services, and even business models to comply with novel demands and regulations concerning sustainability. Since many initiatives toward sustainability are managed in large networks, (digital) ecosystems, and supply chains, they need to be transparent for all involved actors. Continuous data provision within data spaces is an auspicious approach to ensure a holistic understanding beyond organizational boundaries and thus contribute to the overall transparency of networks and supply chains. Prime examples of such spaces are Catena-X or the Mobility Data Space.
Data spaces are defined as an enabler for demand-driven data sharing in a scalable and sovereign way. From a business viewpoint, data spaces are often used colloquially to collect data processing services from various stakeholders. From a technology perspective, data spaces present a distributed data integration concept. In contrast to a traditional data management system, data spaces provide an additional set of services and an abstraction layer that aggregates over the participant system. The software services required for data spaces go beyond the direct data processing services as data spaces require support services that are essential for managing the data space and dealing with metadata and information for data sharing and participant organization. Data Spaces address different perspectives, i.e., operative or strategic, and different subdomains within a company. Hence, it provides a profound base for an inter-organizational service system, building upon the data streams. As a holistic approach, data space-based services enable sustainable business processes throughout the value chain. Given the promising potential of data spaces, this track aims at advancing the progress of the emerging research stream on data spaces, especially to leverage more sustainable production systems and logistics. We welcome empirical and design-oriented papers as well as theoretical and conceptual papers that provide novel insights into employing data spaces for ecological and social sustainability.

Track topics:

Digital services provided through the data space enable involved actors and participants in their endeavors towards implementing and adhering to the Sustainable Development Goals. Against this backdrop, this track searches for papers that tackle the challenges of designing, implementing, and operating data spaces.
Possible topics of interest include but are not limited to the following:
• Intra-organizational service systems
• Data spaces for ecological sustainability (e.g., circularity)
• Service-driven ecosystems and platform concepts for sustainable production and logistics systems
• Smart data models for interoperability in sustainable ecosystems
• Design-oriented descriptions for the implementation and industrial usage
• Sustainable business models for data spaces
• Architectures for service-driven data spaces
• Integration of secure data spaces (e.g., by using standardized infrastructure as provided by IDSA and Gaia-X)
• Data sovereignty in data spaces
• Technologies for sustainable data spaces, such as Digital Twins, Blockchain, and Artificial Intelligence

Track 2: Servitization in SMEs and Entrepreneurship

Track chairs:

Thang Le DinhUniversité du Québec à Trois-Rivières, CanadaThang.Ledinh@uqtr.ca
Claudia PelletierUniversité du Québec à Trois-Rivières, CanadaClaudia.Pelletier@uqtr.ca
Étienne, St-JeanUniversité du Québec à Trois-Rivières, CanadaEtienne.St-jean@uqtr.ca

Description:

In the last decade, servitization has become one of the most active domains in service science, attracting interests from multiple disciplines. Servitization refers to a firm’s transition from a product-centric business model and logic focusing on selling products to a more service-orientated business model and logic that focus on facilitating customer value creation through advanced services and solutions.
The challenges of servitization have gained significant attention from both academics and practitioners. Although existing research has explored the challenges from multiple perspectives, there is still little focus on SMEs (Small to Medium-sized Enterprises) and entrepreneurship domains, which are still dominated by a product-centric perspective.
The proposed track aims to provid a forum for exchanging research ideas and best practices related to new business strategies and models, applications and management of servitization within the context of SMEs and entrepreneurship.
Authors of best papers in the Servitization in SMEs and Entrepreneurship track will be invited to submit revised versions for fast-track review and possible publication in the Journal of Small Business & Entrepreneurship: https://www.tandfonline.com/journals/rsbe20

Track topics:

The track opens to all types of research methods and welcome both theoretical and empirical studies on the following (but not limited to) research topics:

  • Theory, approaches and applications for design, development and deployment of servitization
  • Digitalization and servitization
  • Smart services and servitization
  • Servitization and disruption in manufacturing
  • Industry 4.0 and servitization of business models
  • Servitization frameworks, models and processes
  • Information systems for servitization
  • Impacts of digitalization and servitization on entrepreneurship – Big data, business analytics and artificial intelligence in servitization

Track 3: Smart Citizens for Smart Cities: approach, attitude, awareness, sensitiveness, engagement, participation

Track chairs:

Luca CarrubboUniversity of Salerno, Italylcarrubbo@unisa.it
Leonard WalletzkýMasaryk University of Brno, Czech Republicwallet@mail.muni.cz

Description:

Smart cities have been widely discussed over the last decade. Their potential to solve challenges related to the growth of urbanization, environmental issues and the worldwide trend of population aging are motivating research in this area. New technologies and digital services have been considered as important components in smart cities, as well as the active participation of involved people, since they can connect service providers, users, infrastructures, and communities in a common ecosystem to support value co-creation.
We seek original and innovative contributions on both theoretical and practical aspects concerning human-machine interactions in the context of smart cities, new approaches and attitude of technology usage, models or frameworks that help the researchers and practitioners to foster the development of people awareness, sensitiveness and involvement in smart city for a helpful and insightful participation.

Track topics:

Research topics of the track are as in the follow:

  • Smart Cities and Services
  • Smart Technologies for public services
  • Smart Citizens
  • Service Digitalization
  • Human-Machine interactions
  • People active participation (engagement, empowerment)
  • Value co-creation in Smart Cities

Track 4: Towards Digital Service-Driven Industry Transformation

Track chairs:

Barbara SteffenTU Dortmund University, Germanybarbara.steffen@tu-dortmund.de
Estelle DuparcTU Dortmund University, Germanyestelle.duparc@tu-dortmund.de
Tiziana MargariaCSIS, University of Limerick, Irelandtiziana.margaria@ul.ie
Roisin LyonsKemmy Business School, University of Limerick, Irelandroisin.lyons@ul.ie

Description:

Digitalization forces traditional industries (e.g., logistics, automotive, manufacturing) to evolve continuously. Existing value creation processes and business models get challenged, redesigned, and transformed. Here, digital
services increasingly replace physical products at the heart of the value creation process. This change addresses not only the offer but also the mindset: Successful digital services are value-driven and software-enabled.
Digital services aim at, e.g., easing transparency, connectivity, alignment, and communication among multiple stakeholders along a supply chain or within an ecosystem. To achieve this, all relevant stakeholders need to get
involved and satisfactorily addressed and supported by digital services to ensure their sufficient adoption. This new level of complexity asks for a holistic and customized approach. This is particularly challenging for traditional and currently successful industries. However, a “wait and see approach” is not an option, as Clayton Christensen emphasized in his work on the innovator’s dilemma: when new but neglected technologies cause great firms to fail. There is a pressing need to revitalize the processes inherent and provisions of incumbent companies using digital services in order to protect themselves from the onset of disruptors in the market.
This track invites multidisciplinary research exploring the potential of digital services to foster competitiveness, sustainability, and resilience of established organizations in traditional industries. We aim to analyze and define
currently unused potentials for traditional industries. This covers four research streams:

  1. Methodological: The conceptualization and design of digital services
  2. Economic: Incentives and business models for digital services
  3. Technological: Novel technologies (e.g., OSS, BlockChain, Digital Twins),
    technical/architectural requirements
  4. Practical: Use cases and their desirability, feasibility, and viability

Track topics:

Methodological:
• Models, methods or tools for digital service design (e.g., role models, visual inquiry tools/canvases)

• Holistic business modelling for (industrial) digital services (e.g., complexity theory, systems thinking, integration into dynamic capability theory)
• Design and modelling of digital services based on IT-tool support
Economic:
• Designing innovative digital services
• Designing multi-disciplinary and multi-organizational digital services
• Sustainable, inclusive, and value-based services (e.g., federated services, opensource
services)
• Design and development of smart service platforms and processes
Technological:
• Better software development methods
• Relevant technologies (e.g., OSS, Digital Twins, AI, Big Data, Blockchain)
• Technical requirements (e.g., easing adoption, integration, and connectivity)
• Connecting data-driven supply chains through digital services (e.g., data-driven
services, AI-based services)
Practical:
• Industry transformation through digital services
• Value creation and capture in service systems comprising a multitude of
stakeholders (e.g., IDS, Silicon Economy, Catena-X)

Track 5: Organizing the e-learning: developing research in the digital era

Track chairs:

Eleonora VegliantiUniversité Catholique de Lille, Franceeleonora.veglianti@univ-catholille.fr
Alessandro CaforioInternational Telematic University Uninettuno, Rome, Italyalessandro.caforio@uninettunouniversity.net
Marco De MarcoInternational Telematic University Uninettuno, Rome, Italymarco.demarco@uninettunouniversity.net
Shai RozenesHIT Holon Institute of Technology, Holon, Israelrozeness@hit.ac.il
Elisabetta MagnaghiUniversité Catholique de Lille, FranceElisabetta.MAGNAGHI@univ-catholille.fr

Description:

The innovation tools in the digital learning are increasingly spreading and new challenges and opportunities emerged especially during the COVID-19 pandemic. A large number of universities improve or implement innovative services to have face-to-face classes and exams reaching a national and international presence. Many activities became totally online through collaborative internet platforms and Information and Communications
Technologies (ICTs). Globalization, networked organization and communication technologies allow universities to develop new models of collaboration in teaching, in research, in common programs design, in teachers and students exchange also in a virtual way (Garito, 2019) At the same time, the pandemic creates a unique context that highlights some vulnerabilities and weaknesses of the education system.
Today, it is much clearer than in the past that the current society needs a more flexible and resilient education system approach based on new digital elements and on new services and practices. This is an important aspect both for public and private entities which provides the necessity to rethink about how these institutions are organized.

This track wants to have an interdisciplinary reach covering different areas of research. The papers of this track have the goal of highlighting the evolution of e-learning in the pandemic and post-COVID-19 pandemic which is timely and appropriate. To achieve this aim, this track wants to contribute in theories, methods and best practices employed in the adoption of e-learning systems in order to improve the cognitive continuum of service as well as of e-services science activities (Leonard and Deagoicea, 2021). Furthermore, this track aims at contributing to the discussion about challenges and opportunities raised by new generation of learning technologies and networks, including artificial intelligence, learning analytics, micro-learning, new credentialing, AI-based assessment, massive open online courses (MOOCs), inclusion and ethical concerns in technology-enhanced learning design.

Track topics:

Topics include but are not limited to service design research topics focusing on:
• Digital transformation of higher education institutions
• AI applications in digital education
• Mobile and Ubiquitous learning
• Immersive technologies and Educational Metaverse
• Microcredentials, short programs, micro learning
• Inclusion of vulnerable groups
• Digital ethics of emerging technologies application in education
• Participatory service design in online education

Track 6: Digital innovation through smart services

Track chairs:

Jolita RalyteUniversity of Geneva, Switzerlandjolita.ralyte@unige.ch
Thang Le DinhUniversité du Québec à Trois-Rivières, Canadathang.ledinh@uqtr.ca
Thanh Thoa Pham ThiTU Dublin College of Business, Irelandthoa.pham@tudublin.ie

Description:

Nowadays, the digital disruption and the fourth industrial revolution change fundamentally the way enterprises do business. Enterprises need to innovate to create unique and exceptional competitive advantages. Digital innovation means innovating products, processes, or business models using digital technology platforms as a means to an end within and across organizations. This track aims at expanding our knowledge regarding the adoption of smart services in today’s business landscape to promote the digital innovation. Smart services, which are built based on knowledge-based and intelligent systems and services, have the capacity of self-detecting and self-adaptation to users’ needs without their explicit requests. Big data, business analytics, the Internet of Things and cloud computing provide a huge source of knowledge that allows to determine user contexts and then to enable intelligence capabilities of smart services.

Track topics:

Based on the service science perspective, this track aims at exchanging research ideas and best practices related to new business strategies and models, applications and management of smart services within the context of digital innovation. We are open to all types of research methods and welcome both theoretical and empirical studies on the following (but not limited to) research topics:

  • Innovation roadmaps for smart services
  • Smart service ecosystem and Responsible Entities Learning
  • Theory, approaches and applications for design, development and deployment of knowledge-intensive smart services
  • Smart services for industry 4.0
  • Enabling smart services with knowledge management
  • Predicting user intentions
  • Self-detecting, geolocation-based services
  • User knowledge management, user context in knowledge-intensive smart services
  • Enabling smart services with Big data, Cloud computing and the Internet of Things
  • Smart service innovation, evolution and adaptation
  • Smart services, smart service systems and value co-creation networks
  • Information systems for a smart world, smart cities and smart communities
  • Smart services for crisis management